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Monthly Archives: August 2009

Hogan-Bradshaw [Toe River Valley, NC]

RootsWeb’s WorldConnect Project: The Toe River Valley, NC

# ID: I00816
# Name: Susannah Bradshaw
# Sex: F

Father: Field Bradshaw b: ABT. 1720 in Henrico Co., VA
Mother: Judith Robinson b: 1728 in Cumberland Co., VA

Marriage 1 John R. Hogins

* Married: 8 NOV 1791

 
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Posted by on August 31, 2009 in Uncategorized

 

Meadows-Hogan [Native American connection]

Ransom Middleton Meadows descendants

Hogans are buried in the Native American portion, of the cemetery. A small rock fence separates these families. Anglo American and Native American. No record is available about her mother’s name. [She was Martha “Patsey” O.N. Browning] My grand mother alluded to it as perhaps Thunderburk [this is a misspelling of a local German family name called Funderburg/Funderburk]. When she was only twelve, both of her parents died of typhoid fever within the same week [They died 2 years apart but may have been sick at the same time when he died]. She had no sisters and just one brother. Didema was jolly, pleasant,and easy going. She was quite thrifty, and did not want to waste anything’ She like to talk and visit with everyone. She and Moses always went to Primitive Baptist Church. (Note Primitive Baptist) This probably was literal. She always had her church paper, which was the first church paper published.Moses and Didema Hogan Meadows are buried in Fishpond Cemetery. Moses and Didema children are Daniel (Dan) Ransom Meadows 5-25-1849;d1934 he married Mary B._____(b1849;d.1929 He was a successful farmer and trader of stock and cattle……oel castner

 
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Posted by on August 31, 2009 in Uncategorized

 

Montgomery (Alabama) 1840 Census

Transcription of 1840 Montgomery Census

Much of the 1840 census is illegible, typos are expected … beautiful penmanship with entirely too many loops

 
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Posted by on August 31, 2009 in Uncategorized

 

Montgomery (Alabama) 1840 Census

Transcription of 1840 Montgomery Census

Much of the 1840 census is illegible, typos are expected … beautiful penmanship with entirely too many loops

 
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Posted by on August 31, 2009 in Uncategorized

 

Bourchier, Henry [England]

Henry Bourchier, 1st Earl of Essex – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Henry Bourchier, 1st Earl of Essex
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Henry Bourchier, 5th Baron Bourchier, 1st Viscount Bourchier, 1st Earl of Essex (c. 1404/c. 1406 – 4 April 1483), was the eldest son of William Bourchier and Anne Plantagenet. His mother was a granddaughter of Edward III and, through her mother, great-great-granddaughter of Edward I. He was thus a great-grandson of Edward III.

He inherited the title of Lord (or Baron) Bourchier from his cousin Elizabeth on her death in 1433, became 1st Viscount Bourchier in 1446, a Knight of the Garter in 1452, and was finally created Earl of Essex in 1461.

He was Lord High Treasurer from 29 May 1455 – 5 October 1456, 28 July 1460 – 14 April 1462, and 22 April 1471 – 4 April 1483. He also became Justice in Eyre south of the Trent in 1461, holding that title till his death.

 
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Posted by on August 31, 2009 in Uncategorized

 

Origin of Names – Example

Where do names originate from?

A quick example off the ‘top of my head’ —

FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT

Franklin = has a Middle English origin, meaning “Free landowner”.

Delano = de la Noye:[is of Old French origin][meanings: Of the night|Alder grove.]

* Respelling of French De la Noye, habitational name, with the preposition de, for someone from any of various places called La Noue or La Noë.

Roosevelt = [Dutch origin] meaning, from the ‘rose field’ [or field of roses]:

* An Anglicized version of the Dutch surname VAN ROSEVELT, meaning “of the rose field.”

From reading this you can see that Franklin D. Roosevelt had a varied genealogy — English, French, and Dutch (or German).

Also, from the readings I have been doing about various European Protestant groups, Scottish Crypto-Jews, Sephardic Jews, and French Huguenot surnames. Many of whom were ‘forced’ to leave Europe because of the differing religious or political views.

He could/can have very well had genetic/ancestral “ties” to many of these cultural/genetic groups.

I do know that he is a very distant cousin on my tree — plus he is related to many of the other (previous) presidents of the United States; either by blood or by marriage.

Just a quick note of what you can find out about historical figures (you did not already know) by doing extended family tree research, and surname origins.

More later.

— Cathy Ann Abernathy

weavercat@gmail.com

 
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Posted by on August 24, 2009 in Uncategorized

 

Who Were The Huguenots?

The National Huguenot Society – Who Were the Huguenots?

History
The Huguenots were French Protestants most of whom eventually came to follow the teachings of John Calvin, and who, due to religious persecution, were forced to flee France to other countries in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Some remained, practicing their Faith in secret.

The Protestant Reformation began by Martin Luther in Germany about 1517, spread rapidly in France, especially among those having grievances against the established order of government. As Protestantism grew and developed in France it generally abandoned the Lutheran form, and took the shape of Calvinism. The new “Reformed religion” practiced by many members of the French nobility and social middle-class, based on a belief in salvation through individual faith without the need for the intercession of a church hierarchy and on the belief in an individual’s right to interpret scriptures for themselves, placed these French Protestants in direct theological conflict with both the Catholic Church and the King of France in the theocratic system which prevailed at that time. Followers of this new Protestantism were soon accused of heresy against the Catholic government and the established religion of France, and a General Edict urging extermination of these heretics (Huguenots) was issued in 1536. Nevertheless, Protestantism continued to spread and grow, and about 1555 the first Huguenot church was founded in a home in Paris based upon the teachings of John Calvin. The number and influence of the French Reformers (Huguenots) continued to increase after this event, leading to an escalation in hostility and conflict between the Catholic Church/State and the Huguenots. Finally, in 1562, some 1200 Huguenots were slain at Vassey, France, thus igniting the French Wars of Religion which would devastate France for the next thirty-five years.

 
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Posted by on August 22, 2009 in Uncategorized